Your question: How does the setting of the lottery help to form the story?

How does the setting of the lottery help to form the story What does the setting add to the plot?

The story takes place in a small village with a population around 300 people. The setting effects the story because the lottery and stoning will be quick. … The ways that the characters differentiated is some wish to see someone die and others do not believe in the lottery.

What is the setting of the story for the lottery?

The setting of Shirley Jackson’s short story “The Lottery” takes place in a small, nondescript town located in rural America on the morning of June 27th. Jackson describes the weather on the day of the lottery as being pleasant, clear, and warm, which gives the reader a sense of tranquility and optimism.

How does the setting of the lottery contribute to the irony of the story?

The setting in Jackson’s “The Lottery” is ironic because what the story suggests, and what the reader expects of the setting while reading (normal village with normal people who do normal things) turns out to be untrue. … This is ironic because it is something that is totally unexpected.

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How does the setting in the lottery contribute to the story’s surprising ending?

The setting of Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” really helps to surprise the reader at the end of the story, because everything about the setting stands in sharp contrast to the violence that happens in the final paragraphs. The story ends with an entire community gleefully stoning a fellow community member to death.

What does the setting symbolize in the lottery?

The setting in the beginning of The Lottery, by Shirley Jackson, creates a mood of peacefulness and tranquillity. The image portrayed by the author is that of a typical town on a normal summer day. Shirley Jackson uses this setting to foreshadow an ironic ending.

Which best describes the setting of the lottery?

Answer: The setting of “The Lottery” is, according to Shirley Jackson, her village of Bennington, Vermont: … In her story, Jackson’s village is a rural area, surrounded by other such villages with people who have lived narrow lives and, perhaps as a result of such lives, appear to have narrow minds, as well.

How does the setting affect the lottery?

The setting evokes a pleasant mood. However, Jackson uses irony to create a surprise ending that leaves a lasting impact on a reader. While the setting and mood make the lottery seem like a happy occurrence, in reality, the opposite is true. The winner of the lottery is stoned to death by the townspeople.

What is the irony in The Lottery?

The plot as a whole in “The Lottery” is filled with ironic twists. The whole idea of a lottery is to win something, and the reader is led to believe that the winner will receive some prize, when in actuality they will be stoned to death by the rest of the villagers.

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What is the main conflict in The Lottery?

The main conflict of this short story is character versus society because it is society that insists upon the continuation of the lottery as a tradition, and it is this tradition—upheld by society—which is responsible for the brutal end of Tessie Hutchinson’s life.

What is the climax in The Lottery?

In “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson, the climax is when Tessie is declared the “winner,” the falling action includes the townspeople gathering around her and stoning her, and the resolution is when the town’s life returns to normal.