What are two examples of foreshadowing in the story the lottery?

What are two examples of foreshadowing in the lottery?

Some examples of foreshadowing that Shirley Jackson uses to allude to the evil nature of the lottery include the presence of stones, the ominous black box, and the villagers’ somber, nervous behavior before the start of the ritual.

What foreshadows the end of the lottery?

The ending is foreshadowed by the children collecting stones and the unease of the men. In the second paragraph, the lottery’s bloody nature is foreshadowed by the boys collecting stones.

How does Jackson foreshadow the ending in the lottery?

In “The Lottery,” Jackson uses foreshadowing in the second paragraph by drawing attention to the rocks which will be used in the stoning of Tessie Hutchinson. Bobby Martin stuffs his pockets with stones, for example, while the other boys begin choosing the “smoothest and roundest” stones.

What is the best example of foreshadowing in the lottery?

The excessive mention of the kids in the story, the amount of times the community does the lottery every year, and the importance of the papers that chooses which family will get stones to death are all great examples of foreshadowing in “The Lottery”.

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Why is Tessie singled out as the winner?

Tessie Hutchinson is singled out as the “winner” because she protested against the tradition of the lottery by saying “it isn’t fair.” As she protested, everyone even her own husband and three children joined in stoning her to death. 4.

What does the black box foreshadow in the lottery?

In “The Lottery,” Jackson says that the black box represents tradition, hence the villagers’ reluctance to replace it, despite its shabbiness. The box also implicitly symbolizes death. This symbolic aspect of the box, however, comes more from its function than its form. Its blackness symbolizes death.

What does Mr Graves name symbolize in the lottery?

Martin and his oldest son, Baxter, came forward to hold the box steady on the stool”) Of course, there’s his name, Mr. Graves, which is signaling tombstones, death and a cemetery. He is also the owner of the post office.

How does Jackson foreshadow the ending of the story in paragraphs 2 and 3?

The ending is foreshadowed by the boys gathering stones and the adults’ reaction to them. Jackson does not tell us what is really happening in this village until the very end of the story. It seems like just an ordinary small-town function, like a pie eating contest or a Founder’s Day parade.