What is the exposition of the lottery ticket?

What is the exposition in the lottery?

Exposition: This story takes place in a small village of only 300 people. It is a warm summer day in the pleasant, nourishing town. The villagers gather in the town square for the annual lottery drawing. Children are playing, making piles of stones, while the women gossip and the men congregate.

What is the exposition rising action climax falling action and resolution of the story the lottery?

In “The Lottery,” the exposition includes the description of a peaceful June day, the rising action includes the events of the lottery, the climax includes the reveal that Tessie is the “winner,” the falling action includes the stoning of Tessie, the resolution is that the town returns to normalcy for another year, and

What type of conflict is The Lottery Ticket?

Main Conflict-Ivan and Masha are overcome with greed and quarrel with each other over who gets the money. Type Of Conflict: External Conflict-Man vs. Man.

Where is the climax in the lottery?

In “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson, the climax is when Tessie is declared the “winner,” the falling action includes the townspeople gathering around her and stoning her, and the resolution is when the town’s life returns to normal.

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What is included in the rising action?

Rising action includes the series of events (usually the conflicts or struggles of the protagonist) that increase tension, propel the plot forward, and lead to the climax of the story.

How is conflict used in the lottery?

The main conflict of this short story is character versus society because it is society that insists upon the continuation of the lottery as a tradition, and it is this tradition—upheld by society—which is responsible for the brutal end of Tessie Hutchinson’s life.

What is the moral lesson of The Lottery Ticket?

The main theme of the story “The Lottery Ticket” by Anton Chekhov is that money can corrupt the soul. The prospect of a huge lottery win makes Ivan and Masha look at each other with hatred and suspicion, each one believing that the other will be negatively changed by their sudden windfall.

What does Ivan think of his relatives?

What does Ivan think of his relatives? They are annoying. They are wretched, detestable people.

What is the deeper meaning of The Lottery?

The lottery itself is clearly symbolic and, at its most basic, that symbol is of the unquestioned rituals and traditions which drive our society. The author considers those things which make no inherent sense, yet are done because that is how they have always been done.