Frequent question: What kind or type of prose is the story the lottery?

What kind of literary work is The Lottery?

The Lottery

“The Lottery”
Language English
Genre(s) Short story, Dystopian
Publisher The New Yorker
Publication date June 26, 1948

What literary devices are used in the short story The Lottery?

“The Lottery” uses a number of literary devices to create a story that is almost impossible to forget. It is filled with symbolism, irony and a clear understanding of how to tell a story as well as willingness to embrace controversy.

What narrative is The Lottery?

“The Lottery” is narrated from the third-person objective point of view. The omniscient narrator who reports the story in an objective way without commenting on it. The emotional energy of the story emerges from the events it depicts, such as Tessie’s response to “winning” the lottery.

What Is The Lottery a metaphor for?

The condition of the box—worn-out, faded, stained, and splintered—is a metaphor for the lottery itself, a ritual that has long outlived its usefulness and become worn and obsolete. Although Mr. Summers talks about making a new box, nobody in the village wants to do so.

Why was Tessie late at the gathering to hold The Lottery?

Why was Tessie late to arrive at the gathering to hold the lottery? She started to leave town to protest the lottery. She ran away but was caught and returned.

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What are the symbols in the lottery?

The Lottery Symbols

  • Stones. The stones that the villagers use to kill the victim selected by the lottery are mentioned periodically throughout the story. …
  • The Black Box. …
  • The marked slip of paper.

Is the lottery didactic?

Shirley Jackson’s short story, “The Lottery” is no mere narrative about a custom that one town practices. Rather, this story is meant to serve as a parable; that is “The Lottery” presents readers with a story that illustrates a message, or lesson. It is didactic, not entertaining.

Why was Tessie unhappy with the first drawing?

The reason for Tessie’s unhappiness at the first drawing of the lottery is simple: her family has drawn the slip of paper with the black spot. She tries to claim that the first drawing was unfair—that her husband had not been given enough time to draw the piece of paper that he wanted.

Is The Lottery written in third person omniscient?

“The Lottery” is primarily told in the third-person dramatic point of view, but on occasion the narrator becomes omniscient to divulge information to the reader that which is commonly known to the villagers.